The Girl with the Book Addiction

Ask me anything   I'm a struggling caffeine addict, sometimes writer, wannabe painter, and full-time reader, who tries to see the beauty in all things. A bibliophile at its finest, I actually manage to live my life and keep a variety of other interests.

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"You have to constantly rush headlong at the things that scare you most. Which means you have to take risk after ever-loving risk. And you have to remember that the reward is in the leap itself, not in what comes of it. Because when you take risks you add value to your life. Or when you ask for what you need and what you want—no matter how hard or painful OR TERRIFYING it may be—you learn about your worth, about your extraordinary value"

— 2 days ago with 1 note
"The problem with stereotypes is not that they are untrue, but that they are incomplete. They make one story become the only story."
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, The danger of a single story (via ted)
— 2 days ago with 1154 notes

ted:

Adrianne Haslet-Davis dances again for the first time since the Boston terrorist attack last year. 

When the bombs went off at the Boston Marathon finish line, Adrianne Haslet-Davis lost the lower half of her left leg in the explosion. She’s a ballroom dance teacher, and she assumed she would never dance again. With most prosthetics, she wouldn’t.

But Hugh Herr, of the MIT Media Lab, wanted to find a way to help her. He created a bionic limb specifically for dancers, studying the way they move and adapting the limb to fit their motion. (He explains how he did it here.)

At TED2014, Adrianne danced for the first time since the attack, wearing the bionic limb that Hugh created for her.  

Hugh says, “It was 3.5 seconds between the bomb blasts in the Boston terrorist attack. In 3.5 seconds, the criminals and cowards took Adrianne off the dance floor. In 200 days, we put her back. We will not be intimidated, brought down, diminished, conquered or stopped by acts of violence.”

Amen to that, Hugh. 

Watch the full talk and performance here »

Making me tear up

— 2 days ago with 57642 notes

hokeyfright:

The Philadelphia Phillies used children’s drawings of the starting lineup on the scoreboard in place of their official photos. [deadspin]

They should do this for every game of every sport

(via tastefullyoffensive)

— 3 days ago with 19504 notes
#baseball  #funny 
"Chances are the world doesn’t give a fuck about your plan. Chances are the world is gonna serve you up lovely irregardless of your plan….I’m trying to figure out how can I gain enough compassion to like, forgive myself for all the anger I have at failing, forgive myself for all the times I didn’t have the courage to do whatever I felt my standards were…y’know because we’re all human. We’re not perfect. We are going to disappoint. We have been taught that by being intolerant of yourself…that this is somehow going to get more out of you…There’s nothing more heartbreaking than watching someone still try to lay the whip on themselves when there’s no bare piece of flesh that isn’t scarred….And so for me what I’ve discovered is now that my back looks like Passion of the Christ is that, like, I’ve discovered that for me, my thing is just forgiving myself. Because I’m not gonna live up to whatever it is. I will falter and I will die, like all of us, and the courage that is required is not to be awesome. The courage that is required is how to be human."
— 5 days ago with 285 notes
#junot diaz  #quote 
"A woman is like tea bag. You never know how strong she is until she gets in hot water."
Eleanor Roosevelt (via theessentialshandbook)

(via thestilettocafe)

— 6 days ago with 13 notes
#favorite quote 
quotevadis:

"And now that you don’t have to be perfect, you can be good."
— John Steinbeck, an American author of twenty-seven books, including sixteen novels, six non-fiction books, and five collections of short stories. He is widely known for the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Grapes of Wrath (1939), East of Eden (1952) and the novella Of Mice and Men (1937). Steinbeck received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1962 “for his realistic and imaginative writings, combining as they do sympathetic humour and keen social perception”.

quotevadis:

"And now that you don’t have to be perfect, you can be good."

John Steinbeck, an American author of twenty-seven books, including sixteen novels, six non-fiction books, and five collections of short stories. He is widely known for the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Grapes of Wrath (1939), East of Eden (1952) and the novella Of Mice and Men (1937). Steinbeck received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1962 “for his realistic and imaginative writings, combining as they do sympathetic humour and keen social perception”.

— 6 days ago with 126 notes
#favorite quote